FAQs

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About AAC:

Why can you not issue tax receipts?

Do you have any offices outside Ontario?

About Pets:

My landlord wants to evict me because I have a pet. I have signed a lease that says “no pets”. Can I do anything?

I am moving to Canada from overseas. Can I bring my pet and what documents do I need?

About Wildlife:

I have found an injured / orphaned animal. What should I do?

How do I get rid of an animal from my deck / roof?

About Adopting a Cat or Dog:

I am familiar with Animal Alliance’s Project Jessie program, which rescues cats and dogs from pounds that are required to sell their animals to researchers. How can I adopt one of the rescuees?

I am not in Ontario, or I did not find a cat or dog that is suitable from the contacts above. Where else can I find a cat or dog to adopt?

About Rehoming a Pet:

I need to find a home for my cat/dog/bird etc. Where can I bring him/her?

About Employment / Volunteering:

What sorts of employment opportunities are there at Animal Alliance?

What sorts of volunteer opportunities are there at Animal Alliance?

I am choosing my courses for this year, and eventually want to work for animals. What sorts of skills would I need to work with an animal protection group?

About Animal Cruelty:

I have just witnessed a case of animal cruelty. What can Animal Alliance do?

Questions about AAC:

Q. Why can you not issue tax receipts?

A. Animal Alliance of Canada is a federally registered not-for profit organization. Our federal registration number is 265187-4. We are unable to issue tax receipts due to our non-profit (and not charitable) status. We chose to register as a non-profit because charities are substantially limited in their ability to change legislation, and are only allowed to allocate 10% of their funds to affecting legislative change. At Animal Alliance, we felt that legislative change was imperative to end animal exploitation. Hunting, trapping and other forms of animal “use” are all legal. By affecting legislation, bans can be imposed so that certain practices are no longer permitted legally. We are actually prevented by law from issuing tax receipts.

Q. Do you have any offices outside Ontario?

A. Not yet. However our campaigns span the entire country, and we have two directors in Montreal that can answer any questions in French. Contact george@animalalliance.ca for inquiries in French.

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Questions about Pets

Q. My landlord wants to evict me because I have a pet.   I have signed a lease that says “no pets”.  Can I do anything?

A.  Ontario is the only jurisdiction in Canada where tenants who live in rental accomodations have some protection in law from being evicted because of having a pet.  You are protected from eviction, even if your lease has a “no pets” clause.  However, if the landlord can prove that you are impacting the reasonable enjoyment of other tenants, then the landlord could start eviction proceedings.

If you are renting a unit in a condominium building, you must abide by the condominium rules.  Some condominiums allow pets and others are quite restrictive.

In most other jurisdictions, you have to do your own research to determine which rental accommodations allow pets and which do not.

In addition, you are required to cmply with by-laws in the jurisdiction in which you live.  This may present challenges for you and your pets as the number of permitted pets changes from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Q. I am moving to Canada from overseas.  Can I bring my pet and what documents do I need?

A. Canada does not have a quarantine stipulation, so your pet will not be held back. You will need recent veterinary documents and all of his or her shots. Your pet should be in optimum health before travel.

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Questions about Wildlife

The Ottawa-Carleton Wildlife Center website is an excellent resource for information about wildlife in general and orphaned or injured wildlife. Contact them today for humane options.

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Questions about adopting a cat or dog

Q. I am familiar with Animal Alliance’s Project Jessie program, which rescues cats and dogs from pounds that are required to sell their animals to researchers. How can I adopt one of the rescuees?

A. Thank you for your interest! Please e-mail or call our Project Jessie coordinator Shelly Hawley-Yan at shelly@animalalliance.ca / 519-940-4712. At this time we have animals for adoption only in Ontario. Visit Project Jessie for more information.

Q. I am not in Ontario, or I did not find a cat or dog that is suitable from the contacts above. Where else can I find a cat or dog to adopt?

A. Your local humane society and/or municipal pound should have lots of cats and dogs just dying to see you! In Canada over 1 million cats and dogs are killed in shelters due to the lack of homes. Avoid pet stores and breeders. There is no sense in buying a cat or dog from a store or breeder when so many abandoned animals need loving homes. You may be surprised at the number of purebred animals that wind up in shelters. If you are looking for a particular breed, ask to be put on a contact list for when your ideal pal shows up. Beofore you adopt a pet, please read the next section “Questions about finding a home for a pet”. Carefully consider your lifestyle and how it might change in the future so that you know you can commit to the new family member for his or her lifetime.

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Questions about finding a home for a pet

Q. I need to find a home for my cat/dog/bird/etc. Where can I bring him/her?

A. First, consider all of your options. Pets should not be brought into your home without understanding that it is a lifetime commitment. Cats on average live 15 years. Dogs for 18. Some types of birds can live 50 years! If you are unsure about your lifestyle for the duration of years that your pet will live, don’t get one! Or make the commitment to work around your pet to include your changes. If you think you need to find a home for your pet, read the following common dilemmas:

1. A family member or myself has allergies. Try to resolve the matter by cleaning more intensively and frequently, bathing your pet more often, and converting carpeting to tile or wood floors. Allergies can develop at any time. Just the same, they can disappear at any time. Work with the problem as long as possible before considering finding a home for the animal. Use antihistamines occasionally.

2. I am moving into an apartment and I have signed a lease that says “no pets”. Usually this is the desire of the landlord, but will not hold weight if he or she tries to evict you because of your pet. In Toronto and some other cities you simply cannot be evicted for the simple reason of having a pet – even if you have signed a “No Pets” lease. The exceptions, of course, are if your pet attacks another tenant, causes severe allergic reactions to a tenant or makes excessive noise. First check your City by-laws in this regard, and do not sign any lease before checking to be safe.

3. My pet has a behavioral problem. If your pet has a psychological problem such as wetting the furniture & carpet (and is an adult), has become territorial or aggressive, or has a neurological disorder, understand that he or she will have virtually NO CHANCE of being adopted! For the sake of your pet you must identify the problem and commit to addressing it. He or she will likely be euthanized at the shelter or be deemed “unadoptable” if you do not deal with the problem. Talk to your vet or even a pet psychologist. It is highly irrational to think that a complete stranger will somehow be more apt at fixing your pet’s problems.

4. My lifestyle has changed. I don’t have time for my pet anymore. Would you try to give away your child just because work got a little busier? Animals may not be your flesh and blood, but they are living beings that have come to depend on you and trust you. Being placed in a shelter is very traumatic and the outcome (euthanization or adopted by a cruel or neglectful person) could be much worse than just not seeing you as much anymore. Cats are highly independent animals that do not need your constant, or even frequent, presence. Dogs are pack animals and do need interaction. You can employ the services of a dog-walking service, which are very economical and will give your dog necessary attention and exercise if you find that your life has become busier.

5. My cat/dog gave birth. I need to find homes for X number of puppies/kittens. The fact that you did not fix your pet is in itself irresponsible pet ownership. The million cats and dogs that will be killed in shelters this year would not have died if this message was more clear. Make an appointment today to have the mother spayed. Commit to keeping as many of the babies as you can financially as part of your dues. Unfortunately the others will need to be found homes for. See the end of this segment for your options. See our special section on Pet Overpopulation if you need more information about fixing your pet.

6. My husband/boyfriend who is living with me is abusive to me. I am terrified because a shelter for me won’t allow pets, and I can’t leave the pet with him because I think he’ll harm him/her. What do I do? You and your pet must get out of the situation as soon as possible. Contact your local Humane Society. Many branches will hold your animal temporarily until you get back on your feet. Implore your family or a friend to do so if that fails. If neither works you may have to go one of the routes below. But you must get out of the situation and you must not leave your pet there.

If you find that you still absolutely must find a home for your pet, then you could contact your local humane society. They are generally bursting with animals needing homes and probably won’t take in your pet unless it’s an emergency. You could also place an ad in your local newspaper or veterinary clinic. Never offer a pet for free. Always ask for money. The reasons are a) someone who cannot even afford $25.00 for a pet certainly cannot afford to feed or provide veterinary assistance to the animal, and b) Free animals can be the subject of cruelty for people who like to abuse them – again, a freebie animal is no cost to mean people. Ask friends or family to adopt your pet. That way you always know where your pet is. Finally, sometimes there are foster groups that might have some room for your pet in your area. E-mail us with the name of your city and we will check if we know of anyone in your area.

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Questions about employment or volunteering in the animal protection field

Q. What sorts of employment opportunities are there at Animal Alliance?

A. As a non-profit organization, we are rarely in a position to hire. If, however, you would like to send in your resume, please do so, and we will keep it on file.

Q. What sorts of volunteer opportunities are there at Animal Alliance?

A. We have opportunities for volunteers in Ontario only. Sometimes we need more help in one area than others, so be sure to let us know of all the things you are interested in doing. For volunteer opportunities at the office, please call 416-462-9541. For Project Jessie volunteer opportunities, please call Shelly at 519-940-4712 or e-mail her at shelly@animalalliance.ca

Q. I am choosing my courses for this year, and eventually want to work for animals. What sorts of skills would I need to work with an animal protection group?

A. There are a variety of skills that would be an asset, depending on what you would like your role to be. Groups like ours have a hard time finding people with the skills and the philosophy we need. So taking courses in accounting, management and computers are a great starting point that would help in the day-to-day operations of a non-profit. Specialty services, such as lawyers, veterinarians and biologists also contribute to the work we do. Certainly courses in philosophy, environmental science or psychology would help you to understand the broader issues and your ability to respond to those outside of the movement. Clearly you need to identify what role you would like to play in the group of your choice.

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Questions about animal cruelty you have witnessed

Q. I have just witnessed a case of animal cruelty. What can Animal Alliance do?

A. Unfortunately we do not have the power to lay cruelty charges. Only the SPCA, the Humane Society and the police can do so. You need to call them right away. But note that you need to have proof of the cruelty. The animal being abused cannot speak and verify your claim, so be sure to employ the cooperation of witnesses who can back up your claim at all costs. If you witness ongoing abuse, you should try to document the abuse as best you can. Write everything down while it is still fresh in your memory.

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